The typical Jupiter formation model begins with solid growth followed by a phase of rapid gas growth in which Jupiter envelope of hydrogen and helium is extracted from the old solar nebula. In this case, the primary solids of solid solids can be kilometer-sized plot-decimals (Pollack et al. 1996) or centimeter grains (Lambrechts et al. 2014), which have a significant impact on the formation of time scales and the distribution of heavy objects in the Jupiter envelope (Venturini & Helled 2020; Vazan et al. 2018). In the case of a Simal Planet, the accumulation of solids continues through the gas phase and stops when all the planets in the planet’s area are authorized. The disintegration and degradation of these solid planets result in a non-homogeneous distribution of heavy elements in the envelope (Alibert et al., 2018).

In contrast, in the case of rock mass, the rapid orbital decay of rocks caused by gas leaks provides the continuous discovery of solid materials enriching the growing planet (Ormel et al., 2021). However, the supply stops when the so-called mass fragmentation is reached (Lambrechts et al. 2014), after which only gas accumulation continues outside or until the rocks grow to the planet’s size. Here we seek to distinguish between these conditions, analyzing the internal structure of Jupiter today and determining whether the Jupiter envelope has a distinct homogeneous distribution of heavy elements. We examine the possible separation of heavy components in an envelope, examining whether this separation is a natural result of a set of models that reproduce all the barriers to observation, including those given the latest Juno look.
Jupiter seems to be a terrifying place. More than 300 times the size of Earth (and twice the size of any other planet), the Master of the Planet has twice the force of gravity and powerful, dry air. And you know the Big Red Dot on its face? Well, the storm has been raging for centuries—really scary stuff.

But some scientists now think Jupiter may be a more enormous beast than we once thought. An article in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics suggests that the planet may have developed into a malignant disorder of eating up other worlds.

Jupiter seems to be a terrifying place. More than 300 times the size of Earth (and twice the size of any other planet), the Master of the Planet has twice the force of gravity and an unusually strong, dry air. And you know the Big Red Dot on its face? Well, the storm has been raging for centuries—really scary stuff.

But some scientists now think Jupiter may be a more enormous beast than we once thought. An article in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics suggests that the planet may have developed into a malignant disorder of eating up other worlds.

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Alice is the Chief Editor with relevant experience of three years, Alice has founded Galaxy Reporters. She has a keen interest in the field of science. She is the pillar behind the in-depth coverages of Science news. She has written several papers and high-level documentation.

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